Technical Tips and Tricks

For any sport holding a degree of danger, checks can mean the difference between life and death and ensure riders have a good experience every time they set out for a ride.

Pre-Ride Checks

Featured image Technical Tips and Tricks Pre Ride Checks - Technical Tips and Tricks

Pre-ride checks can include checking the pressure and thread of tires. Pressure must be checked when the bike’s tires are cold. If a motorcycle has a chain, belt or shaft drive, the chain tension must be checked. The chain must be well lubricated. As with a vehicle, a rider must see that all lights and electrics are in order.

Riders should check brake lights, indicators, horn, and high and low beam lights. Cables and hoses must be checked to see that there are no fraying and ensure there is no binding when a rider turns the handlebars. As for motorcycles, a post-ride check is essential to check if anything came loose during a ride.

Avoid Rookie Mistakes

Featured image Technical Tips and Tricks Avoid Rookie Mistakes - Technical Tips and Tricks

Some riding tips can also protect a rider’s motorcycle, and by avoiding some rookie mistakes, a rider can go longer without a dent in the engine. The first of these silly mistakes is when a rider steps on an uneven road and suddenly feels the motorcycle’s complete weight when he puts a foot down.

The next tip to remember is that it is never a good idea to break in a turn when riding. Instead, a rider should focus on the turn’s exit and put gas to get out of the turn unscathed. City slickers should avoid white marks, utility hole covers and plastic retarders on the road as it can be slippery when wet.

Another trick for riders trying to get through traffic fast is to keep it slow, make sure motorists are aware of them in the rearview mirror, and take great care zigzagging between cars.

The Sound of Silence

Featured image Technical Tips and Tricks The Sound of Silence - Technical Tips and Tricks

Many riders like to roll to the sound of music, but riders should consider their vulnerability on a motorcycle. If hearing a hooter, siren, or truck can mean a rider stay alive, it is maybe wiser to keep Queen’s Rapsody for home. With the engine roaring in one’s ears, it is difficult to imagine a motorist not hearing a rider, but that motorist might also have Queen on at full blast.

It is important to always expect the unexpected, like a driver changing lanes right in front of a motorcycle at the last minute.

Riders can subscribe to forums for staying clued up about a country’s laws on motorcycling, but technical tips for motorcycles are universal.